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Next week marks a grim anniversary for Las Vegas. The single deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. A man opened fire from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino into crowds at a country music festival on Oct. 1, 2017. He killed 58 people, injured hundreds more and left this city reeling.

A year on the city is still healing. We spoke to two survivors.

'I hid under someone who was dead'

Meet Nevada's 'Trump Of Pahrump'

10 minutes ago

Dennis Hof sits on a red and black velvet couch under TV screens that flash pictures of scantily clad women. Behind him, the doorbell is ringing and women in lingerie line up. Men walk in, select one of the women, sit with them at the bar and eventually head down a long hallway into bedrooms.

"We call it a meet and greet. So a customer comes up and the bell goes off and we let the girls know there's a new client in the house come out and meet him," he says, sipping on iced coffee and explaining the ways of his brothel.

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New Book: Vaccines Have Always Had Haters

1 hour ago

Vaccinations have saved millions, maybe billions, of lives, says Michael Kinch, associate vice chancellor and director of the Center for Research Innovation in Business at Washington University in St. Louis. Those routine shots every child is expected to get can fill parents with hope that they're protecting their children from serious diseases.

But vaccines also inspire fear that something could go terribly wrong. That's why Kinch's new book is aptly named: Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity.

Within three days of starting high school this year, my ninth-grader could not get into bed before 11 p.m. or wake up by 6 a.m. He complained he couldn't fall asleep, but felt foggy during the school day, and had to reread lessons a few times at night to finish his homework. And forget morning activities on the weekends — he was in bed.

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